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News: An ancient article of Journal Des Debats, published in 1818 with the prediction of Mlle Lenormand, was bought this week for the museum.

An article of Journal Des Debats, published in 1818 with the prediction of Mlle Lenormand, was bought this week for the museum. This object is very important because it is the only one which has the prediction in public of Mlle Lenormand.




Some information about Mlle Lenormand:

Marie Anne Adelaide Lenormand (1772–1843) was a French professional fortune-teller of considerable fame during the Napoleonic era. In France Lenormand is considered the greatest cartomancer of all time, highly influential on the wave of French cartomancy that began in the late 18th century. Lenormand was born on 27 May 1772 in Alençon, Normandy, to Jean Louis Antoine Lenormand, a draper, and Marie Anne Lenormand (née Gilbert). Lenormand was orphaned at the age of five and educated in a convent school. Lenormand left Alençon for Paris in 1786. Lenormand claimed to have given cartomantic advice to many famous persons, among them leaders of the French revolution (Marat, Robespierre and St-Just), Empress Josephine and Tsar Alexander I. She was active for more than 40 years. In 1814 Lenormand started a second literary career and published many texts, causing many public controversies. She was imprisoned more than once, though never for very long. Death[edit] Lenormand died in Paris on 25 June 1843 and is buried in Division 3 of Père Lachaise Cemetery. She left behind a fortune of 500,000 Francs, and left no heirs other than a nephew who, at the time of her death, was in the army.A devout Catholic, her nephew burned all of Mme. Lenormand's Occult paraphernalia; taking only the monetary fortune that she left behind.

After Lenormand's death her name was used on several cartomancy decks including a deck of 36 illustrated cards known as the Petit Lenormand or simply Lenormand cards still used extensively today. The 36 card Lenormand deck is modelled on a deck of cards published c1799 as part of Das Spiel der Hoffnung (The Game of Hope), a game of chance designed by Johann Kaspar Hechtel of Nuremberg.

Some information about Journal des Debats:

The Journal des débats (French for: Journal of Debates) was a French newspaper, published between 1789 and 1944 that changed title several times. Created shortly after the first meeting of the Estates-General of 1789, it was, after the outbreak of the French Revolution, the exact record of the debates of the National Assembly, under the title Journal des Débats et des Décrets ("Journal of Debates and Decrees"). Published weekly rather than daily, it was headed for nearly forty years by Bertin l'Aîné and was owned for a long time by the Bertin family. During the First Empire, it was opposed to Napoleon, and had a new title imposed on it, the Journal de l'Empire. During the first Bourbon Restoration (1813–14), the Journal took the title Journal des Débats Politiques et Littéraires, and, under the second Restoration, it took a conservative rather than reactionary position.Under Charles X and his entourage, the Journal changed to a position supporting the liberal opposition represented by the Doctrinaires (Guizot, Royer-Collard, etc.) (1827–1829). The Journal des Débats was the most read newspaper of the Restoration and the July Monarchy, before being surpassed by Emile de Girardin's La Presse and later by Le Petit Journal. The many contributions established the Journal's reputation as a major influence on French culture, and especially French literature for the first half of the 19th century. During the German occupation, the Journal continued to be published, which caused it to be suppressed after the Liberation of Paris in 1944.

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